The GARE staff eagerly awaits the opportunity to welcome government racial equity practitioners and leaders to the 2022 GARE Annual Membership Meeting, on April 19-21, 2022. The theme for 2022 is: "Reimagining Government to Advance Racial Equity and Justice."

The GARE Annual Membership Meeting is your chance to meet colleagues, share and exchange promising practices and energize one another as we embark on another year of advancing racial equity within our jurisdictions. We want to ensure that members have attendance options during the ongoing pandemic, so we are hosting the conference online and in person in Portland, OR. This form is for members looking to lead a session at the in-person offering of the event, which will include a total of 40 breakout sessions throughout the duration of the conference.

Practitioners determine the program content, and we invite you to submit a proposal for an in-depth breakout session that highlights an innovative racial equity practice or policy. Each session can feature up to three presenters; and may need to accommodate up to 100 attendees. Please note that all speakers are expected to register for the in-person conference and pay for their travel and lodging.

We encourage jurisdictions to think creatively about how to present your content – by working with other jurisdictions to submit a proposal together; inviting community members to present alongside you; or, showcasing your work in another innovative way.

For full consideration, please submit your proposals by 8:00pm on December 30th, 2021. GARE will respond with selections decisions before the end of January.


Please reference the information below as you develop your proposal.


CONFERENCE TRACKS:

Sessions should aim to fit one of these tracks. These may change according to the submissions received.

1. Organizational Change

Government often gets stuck in a mind-frame of “business as usual” which creates obstacles to changing practices that undermine the well-being or actively harm, Black, Indigenous, Latino/a/x, Asian and Pacific Islanders, Southwest Asian, and North African communities. This track will highlight how jurisdictions have created internal changes to programmatic and organizational policies and practices that overcome these obstacles.

2. Cultivating Resilience

The racial and economic disparities plaguing our Black, Indigenous, Latino/a/x, Asian and Pacific Islanders, Southwest Asian and North African communities intensify their susceptibility to threats brought on by the ongoing pandemic, as well as the climate crisis. Jurisdictions must become proactive in designing strategies that seal these long-standing racial and economic divides. This track will showcase the various approaches jurisdictions have taken to advance equity in this regard. Think resilience frameworks and systems for community support.

3. Narrative and Communications

Current events have catalyzed efforts for advancing racial equity yet, the ongoing attacks on critical race theory function to stymy this momentum. Racial justice leaders who illuminate a bold and clear vision of what a just, multiracial democracy looks and feels like can set a new path forward. This track will profile jurisdictions that have strategically harnessed narrative and communications to reinforce the transformative power of racial equity work.

4. Budgeting for Racial Equity

Incorporating a racial equity framework takes resources, and tools and toolkits are not enough. To make tangible change, jurisdictions must increase their organizational capacity through strategic planning efforts, investments, and resource allocation. This track will focus on the strategies jurisdictions use to budget for racial equity.


DESIGN ELEMENTS:

Breakout sessions should be interactive, with intentional engagement between participants and presenters, including audience-centered virtual formats, exercises, and Q&A.

Preference will be given to proposals that fulfill 4 or more of the following elements:

Practical (Toolkits): Sessions will lead with tools, and tactics to offer skills, and ideas that participants can use.

GARE Framework: The session offers examples of one or more aspects of the GARE framework of Normalize, Organize, Operationalize & Visualize.

Institutional Analysis: Facilitators and participants analyze functions of power and the institutional dimensions of racism to surface root causes and contributing factors.

Solutions-oriented: The session will offer concrete, viable and equitable solutions. They aim to change systems, shift power, and advance racial equity in our governmental institutions.

Multiracial and Intersectional: Facilitators have a multi-racial and intersectional analysis and approach even if there is a mono-racial emphasis. A multiracial, intersectional team of facilitators is also encouraged. A plus if the session represents multiple jurisdictions.

√ Community-Based: The session emphasizes strategies for equitable community participation and participatory practices.


Sessions We DON’T Want:

X Academic or purely conceptual lectures or presentations;

X Sessions focused primarily on the personal and interpersonal dynamics of racism;

X Workshops that focus on “diversity” training, cultural competency, cross-racial dialogues, and multi-cultural awareness without connection to a larger theme or listed aim; and

X Sessions without attention to solutions.


To avoid any disruption and/or confusion during the conference, we ask that you please arrive 35 minutes early to your session for troubleshooting.


Questions/Comments about proposals? Email us at gareamm@raceforward.org, and include "RFP Question" in the subject line.

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The GARE staff eagerly awaits the opportunity to welcome government racial equity practitioners and leaders to the 2022 GARE Annual Membership Meeting, on April 19-21, 2022. The theme for 2022 is: "Reimagining Government to Advance Racial Equity and Justice."

The GARE Annual Membership Meeting is your chance to meet colleagues in other jurisdictions; share and exchange best practices; and energize each other as you embark on another year of advancing racial equity within your respective jurisdictions. We want to ensure that members have attendance options during the ongoing pandemic, so we are hosting the conference online and in person in Portland, OR. This form is for members looking to lead a session at the online offering of the event, which will include a total of 12 breakout sessions throughout the duration of the conference.

Practitioners determine the program content, and we invite you to submit a proposal for an in-depth breakout session that highlights an innovative racial equity practice or policy. Each session can feature up to three presenters; and may need to accommodate up to several hundred attendees. GARE may choose to provide a moderator for each session. Please note that all speakers are expected to register for the online conference.

We encourage jurisdictions to think creatively about how to present your content – by working with other jurisdictions to submit a proposal together; by inviting community members to present alongside you; or by showcasing your work in another innovative way.

For full consideration, please submit your proposals by 8:00pm on December 30th, 2021. GARE will respond with selections decisions before the end of January.


Please reference the information below as you develop your proposal.


CONFERENCE TRACKS:

Sessions should aim to fit one of these tracks. These may change according to the submissions received.

1. Organizational Change

Government often gets stuck in a mind-frame of “business as usual” which creates obstacles to changing practices that undermine the well-being or actively harm, Black, Indigenous, Latino/a/x, Asian and Pacific Islanders, Southwest Asian, and North African communities. This track will highlight how jurisdictions have created internal changes to programmatic and organizational policies and practices that overcome these obstacles.

2. Cultivating Resilience

The racial and economic disparities plaguing our Black, Indigenous, Latino/a/x, Asian and Pacific Islanders, Southwest Asian and North African communities intensify their susceptibility to threats brought on by the ongoing pandemic, as well as the climate crisis. Jurisdictions must become proactive in designing strategies that seal these long-standing racial and economic divides. This track will showcase the various approaches jurisdictions have taken to advance equity in this regard. Think resilience frameworks and systems for community support.

3. Narrative and Communications

Current events have catalyzed efforts for advancing racial equity yet, the ongoing attacks on critical race theory function to stymy this momentum. Racial justice leaders who illuminate a bold and clear vision of what a just, multiracial democracy looks and feels like can set a new path forward. This track will profile jurisdictions that have strategically harnessed narrative and communications to reinforce the transformative power of racial equity work.

4. Budgeting for Racial Equity

Incorporating a racial equity framework takes resources, and tools and toolkits are not enough. To make tangible change, jurisdictions must increase their organizational capacity through strategic planning efforts, investments, and resource allocation. This track will focus on the strategies jurisdictions use to budget for racial equity.


DESIGN ELEMENTS:

Breakout sessions should be interactive, with intentional engagement between participants and presenters, including audience-centered virtual formats, exercises, and Q&A.

Preference will be given to proposals that fulfill 4 or more of the following elements:

Practical (Tool-Kits): Sessions will lead with tools, and tactics to offer skills, and ideas that participants can use.

GARE Framework: The session offers examples of one or more aspects of the GARE framework of Normalize, Organize, Operationalize & Visualize.

Institutional Analysis: Facilitators and participants analyze functions of power and the institutional dimensions of racism to surface root causes and contributing factors.

Solutions-oriented: The session will offer concrete, viable and equitable solutions. They aim to change systems, shift power, and advance racial equity in our governmental institutions.

Multiracial and Intersectional: Facilitators have a multi-racial and intersectional analysis and approach even if there is a mono-racial emphasis. A multiracial, intersectional team of facilitators is also encouraged. A plus if the session represents multiple jurisdictions.

√ Community-Based: The session emphasizes strategies for equitable community participation and participatory practices.


Sessions We DON’T Want:

X Academic or purely conceptual lectures or presentations;

X Sessions focused primarily on the personal and interpersonal dynamics of racism;

X Workshops that focus on “diversity” training, cultural competency, cross-racial dialogues, and multi-cultural awareness without connection to a larger theme or listed aim; and

X Sessions without attention to solutions.


To avoid any disruption and/or confusion during the online conference, we ask that you please adhere to the following:

  1. Attend a 90-minute virtual conference platform training;
  2. Attend a 45-minute tech rehearsal (will be scheduled in early April); and
  3. Arrive 35 minutes early to your session for troubleshooting,


Questions/Comments about proposals? Email us at gareamm@raceforward.org, and include "RFP Question" in the subject line.

2022 GARE ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING